Reflections on a falling crucifix

CBS

I’d like to begin this post by expressing my regret that, after enduring the pain and emotional exhaustion of a wife battling cancer, a man lost his leg in an accident involving a falling crucifix.  I begin with that expression of regret because I want to be clear that I don’t bear any negative feelings toward the man described in this CBS 2 story from New York

It was tragic. 

But in reading this story I was presented with a few theological considerations, perhaps prompted by poor or unclear writing: “David Jimenez believed his devotion to a crucifix was responsible for his wife being cured of cancer,” it says.  This sentence infers the man had a devotion to a particular object, a crucifix.  And in his desire to show reverence for that object, it dislodged and crushed his leg.  What is this story saying, or not, about faith, and about God?

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Musical Introspection

Urban beauty

Editor’s note: This is a post about  projecting our own experiences, troubles, and musings on prose of all kinds, and how it relates to my times of spiritual renaissance.

With each breath the wheat stalks seemed to blur into golden oceans begging for navigation.  Though I have sailed true blue water, these golden waves of grain could not be traversed by wind, but by will.  My breathing and straining formed the cadence.  My mind drifted in and out of the large and small problems of me.

The Chipman Trail connects Moscow, Idaho with Pullman, Washington—two university towns in the agriculture-rich Palouse region.  Chipman is a smoothly paved pathway for bicycles and runners traveling between the towns, running parallel to the highway.  Despite traffic nearby, the grain, barns, bridges, and animals give a uniquely American impression: that space is wide-open, and nature can still seem unlimited.

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New Year, Some Old Problems

True that

It was clear with the commercials for payday loans, video games, and “the only way to tell her you love her”…jewelry of course.  It was also clear during midnight mass, with the less-than-cheery gentleman sitting and scowling next to us.  The holiday season is also clearly in effect as homeless men and women flood the vacant street corners with sometimes curious, sometimes suspicious signs.

Phoenix is an anomaly because of its climate.  A warm summer prevents homeless residents from panhandling during the day…it’s just too hot, and every year people literally die from the 115 degree highs.  But during the holiday season homelessness is more evident, though the legitimacy of those in need is not always clear.

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Adapting to “Normal”

Hold fast

You could call this a precursor to the much-anticipated “In Search of Blue Water: Part 2.”  I’m sure my reflections on sailing the coastal waters of Catalina/Santa Barbara Islands will be just as potent, if not more introspective.  This post is my warm-up.  The last weeks re-acclimating to the U.S., to another time zone, to “standard” food, entertainment, and everyday trials have been interestingly frustrating.  No thanks to, but not exclusively because of, the Sandman.

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Thoughts on Time

Joe's Cactus
Written by Joe Trudeau
Time is an interesting concept. On the one hand, it’s finite: How long until this is over? Or when do we get to eat? Or even, how many days are left in the school year? On the theological hand, time is a contradiction: Our time is eternal and immeasurable due to our faith in the Lord of Hosts, and eternity.  But even with this belief that time is–in the grand scheme–insignificant, all of our days seem to be centered around the clock; beginning with the alarm in the morning, arrival at work, school bells when we were kids, lunch hour, meeting times, television show times, and even bed time. We can’t escape time.

I struggle with devoting mental energy to time when countless people through history have already done so, though to no sure conclusion. I can say for a fact, however, that I revere few things more than my reverence for time.

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“And Jesus wept…”

Weeping
 Die-hard football fans already know this, I’m sure, but the New England Patriots failed to reach “Perfection,” as color commentators had labeled it, instead falling to the New York Giants in the Super Bowl tonight.  For this post, I’ll resist the temptation to decimate the use of “perfection” to describe overpaid athletes.  I have many problems with professional sports, notably among those problems is hero-worship, and the sick amounts of money thrown at a game in salaries, advertising, etc.

Today, however, being the biggest game of the season, takes this show of capitalistic prowess to a new level.  This level happened to be above the call of God, according to one Phoenix-area church.

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