Sprichst du Deutsch? Almost.

Rhineland sailing

I’ve been mulling a post about the role of digital media, and how bloggers, online video, and similar devices should be infusing journalism, instead of causing it’s slow stagger toward the respirator, and a ready-to-be-pulled plug.  While that sour jolt of professional pride may still be forthcoming, I thought I’d share instead a small victory in another quest of mine: learning German.

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Finding Fairness

Murrow's Way
Murrow's Way

Ed Murrow said a journalist could be fair, if not objective. But in his day reporters also acted as ‘news analysts.’

Depending on your perspective, the “Mainstream Media” may be part of either a vast left-wing, or Kentucky Fried right-wing conspiracy.  Thighs and drumsticks aside, these judgments are often based on a person’s own sense of injustice to a certain cause.  If a news outlet passes over, or offers inadequate coverage of a subject hold dear, said outlet must be serving its own agenda. 

I don’t wish to defend or explain the perceived lack of neutrality of certain outlets, but in the same breath I can talk a little to what a news story should contain. 

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“And Jesus wept…”

Weeping
 Die-hard football fans already know this, I’m sure, but the New England Patriots failed to reach “Perfection,” as color commentators had labeled it, instead falling to the New York Giants in the Super Bowl tonight.  For this post, I’ll resist the temptation to decimate the use of “perfection” to describe overpaid athletes.  I have many problems with professional sports, notably among those problems is hero-worship, and the sick amounts of money thrown at a game in salaries, advertising, etc.

Today, however, being the biggest game of the season, takes this show of capitalistic prowess to a new level.  This level happened to be above the call of God, according to one Phoenix-area church.

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Arizona’s Wilderness

A flattened world
If you take a dirt road long enough you’ll find your way home.  Near Wickenburg, Arizona, that dirt road is called Constellation, and it winds you through stages of the state’s history.  The road passes a stage coach stop; numerous mines; washes with names like “King Solomon”; walls built by Chinese and native workers.

After driving 8 miles on cliffs and over ridges you find yourself at a fork, and finally at the Williams Family Ranch.

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